Bulgarian Supercup

Supercup football match of Bulgaria

Football league
Bulgarian Football Supercup
Bulgarian Supercup logo.png
Founded1989; 33 years ago (1989)
2004; (restored)
CountryBulgaria
ConfederationUEFA
Number of teams2
Current championsLudogorets Razgrad (6th title)
Most championshipsLudogorets Razgrad (6 titles)
WebsiteOfficial Site

The Bulgarian Supercup (Bulgarian: Суперкупа на България) is the trophy won in a football match held between the football club that has won the Bulgarian first football division in the season that ended in the year of the match and the holder of the Bulgarian Cup at that time. In case the champion of Bulgaria has also won the cup, the Bulgarian Cup finalist competes with the champion in the match for the trophy.

The Supercup match is usually held during the weekend before the start of a new season. Since 2004 the Supercup game has been an annual event. The most successful club in the event is Ludogorets Razgrad with six Supercup titles and four times being runners-up. Ludogorets is the club that has participated in most seasons of the Supercup with ten appearances. The competition has been dominated by Sofia-based teams. The Sofia teams have won together a total number of 7 titles.

History

Inaugural Event 1989

Bulgarian Supercup 1989

The first match for the Bulgarian Supercup was held in 1989. The match was proposed by Kiril Zaharinov, sports editor at the Bulgarian News Agency and secretary of the union of the Bulgarian sport journalists at that time.

The match was held at 9th September Stadium in Burgas, opposing 1988-89 Bulgarian champion and Cup holder CFKA Sredets (now CSKA Sofia) and the runner-up in the 1988–89 edition of the Bulgarian Cup Chernomorets Burgas. CSKA won the match 1-0 thanks to a goal by Hristo Stoichkov.

The first Supercup trophy was made in Italy and was 80 cm tall, weighing 15 kg. Today it is kept in the CSKA Sofia museum.

Since 2004

Bulgarian Supercup (2007-2011)
Bulgarian Supercup (2011-)

After the political changes of 1989 in Eastern Europe the Bulgarian Supercup match was suspended. Fourteen years later the Bulgarian Professional Football League in association with the Bulgarian Football Union decided to restore the event organising a Supercup match between the champion of the 2003-04 season, PFC Lokomotiv Plovdiv and the 2003–04 Bulgarian Cup holder, PFC Litex Lovech. The match was held at Naftex Stadium in Burgas and Lokomotiv won 1-0 after a last-minute goal by Ivan Paskov.

Since the restoration of the tournament in 2004 ten teams have participated in the event and eight of them have managed to win the trophy - PFC Litex Lovech (winners in 2010), PFC Beroe Stara Zagora (winners in 2013), PFC Cherno More Varna (winners in 2015), PFC Botev Plovdiv (winners in 2017), Lokomotiv Plovdiv (winners in 2004 and 2020), PFC Levski Sofia (winners in 2005, 2007 and 2009), PFC CSKA Sofia (winners in 2006, 2008 and 2011) and PFC Ludogorets Razgrad (winners in 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2021).

In 2021 the winner of the cup Ludogorets Razgrad became the single most successful team in the event, winning their fifth trophy as they beat CSKA Sofia with final score 4-0. Also, as of 2021 Ludogorets Razgrad has participated nine times in the Supercup match - most of all other participants.

From 2004 onwards a brand new trophy is made for every event as it was decided by the organisers that each Supercup winner should retain the trophy in perpetuity. However, three designs have been used for the trophy as of 2004 - one for the Supercups of 2004–2006, another for the trophies of 2007-2010 and the third from 2011 onwards. The current trophy was designed in Italy in 2007 and is 100 cm tall.

Supercup finals

Season Date Winner Score Runner-up Venue Attendance Report
1989 15 July 1989 CFKA Sredets (1)
Winner of 1988–89 A Group and 1988–89 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 0 Chernomorets Burgas
Runner-up of 1988–89 Bulgarian Cup
9th September Stadium,
Burgas
20,000 Report
2004 31 July 2004 Lokomotiv Plovdiv (1)
Winner of 2003–04 A Group
1 – 0 Litex
Winner of 2003–04 Bulgarian Cup
Naftex Stadium,
Burgas
4,300 Report
2005 31 July 2005 Levski Sofia (1)
Winner of 2004–05 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 1 (a.e.t.)
(3–1 p)
CSKA Sofia
Winner of 2004–05 A Group
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
9,894 Report
2006 30 July 2006 CSKA Sofia (2)
Winner of 2005–06 Bulgarian Cup
0 – 0 (a.e.t.)
(3–0 p)
Levski Sofia
Winner of 2005–06 A Group
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
9,751 Report
2007 26 July 2007 Levski Sofia (2)
Winner of 2006–07 A Group and 2006–07 Bulgarian Cup
2 – 1 (a.e.t.) Litex
Runner-up of 2006–07 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
14,000 Report
2008 3 August 2008 CSKA Sofia (3)
Winner of 2007–08 A Group
1 – 0 Litex
Winner of 2007–08 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
8,950 Report
2009 1 August 2009 Levski Sofia (3)
Winner of 2008–09 A Group
1 – 0 Litex
Winner of 2008–09 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
2,300 Report
2010 12 August 2010 Litex (1)
Winner of 2009–10 A Group
2 – 1 (a.e.t.) Beroe
Winner of 2009–10 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
1,700 Report
2011 30 July 2011 CSKA Sofia (4)
Winner of 2010–11 Bulgarian Cup
3 – 1 Litex
Winner of 2010–11 A Group
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
12,620 Report
2012 11 July 2012 Ludogorets Razgrad (1)
Winner of 2011–12 A Group and 2011–12 Bulgarian Cup
3 – 1 Lokomotiv Plovdiv
Runner-up of 2011–12 Bulgarian Cup
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
2,730 Report
2013 10 July 2013 Beroe (1)
Winner of 2012–13 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 1 (a.e.t.)
(5–3 p)
Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2012–13 A Group
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
1,070 Report
2014 13 August 2014 Ludogorets Razgrad (2)
Winner of 2013–14 A Group and 2013–14 Bulgarian Cup
3 – 1 Botev Plovdiv
Runner-up of 2013–14 Bulgarian Cup
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
4,400 Report
2015 12 August 2015 Cherno More (1)
Winner of 2014–15 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 0 Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2014–15 A Group
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
1,810 Report
2016 Not held
Not played §
2017 9 August 2017 Botev Plovdiv (1)
Winner of 2016–17 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 1
(5–4 p)
Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2016–17 First League
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
3,800 Report
2018 5 July 2018 Ludogorets Razgrad (3)
Winner of 2017–18 First League
1 – 0 Slavia Sofia
Winner of 2017–18 Bulgarian Cup
Trace Arena,
Stara Zagora
850 Report
2019 3 July 2019 Ludogorets Razgrad (4)
Winner of 2018–19 First League
2 – 0 Lokomotiv Plovdiv
Winner of 2018–19 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
3,800 Report
2020 2 August 2020 Lokomotiv Plovdiv (2)
Winner of 2019–20 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 0 Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2019–20 First League
Huvepharma Arena,
Razgrad
0 Report
2021 17 July 2021 Ludogorets Razgrad (5)
Winner of 2020–21 First League
4 – 0 CSKA Sofia
Winner of 2020–21 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
8,800 Report
2022 1 September 2022 Ludogorets Razgrad (6)
Winner of 2021–22 First League
2 – 2
(4–3 p)
Levski Sofia
Winner of 2021–22 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
21,342 Report

§ Note: The 2016 Bulgarian Supercup was meant to be the 14th Bulgarian Supercup, an annual Bulgarian football match played between the winners of the previous season's A PFG and Bulgarian Cup. The game was to be played between CSKA Sofia, winners of the 2016 Bulgarian Cup, and Ludogorets Razgrad, champions of the 2015–16 A PFG. However, prior to the match CSKA Sofia went into bankruptcy, followed by taking another team's professional license. As a consequence, the 2016 Bulgarian Supercup final was not held.

Performance

Performance by club

Club Winners Runners-up Year(s) Won Year(s) lost
Ludogorets Razgrad
6
4
2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022 2013, 2015, 2017, 2020
CSKA Sofia
4
2
1989, 2006, 2008, 2011 2005, 2021
Levski Sofia
3
2
2005, 2007, 2009 2006, 2022
Lokomotiv Plovdiv
2
2
2004, 2020 2012, 2019
Litex
1
5
2010 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
Beroe
1
1
2013 2010
Botev Plovdiv
1
1
2017 2014
Cherno More
1
2015
Chernomorets Burgas
1
1989
Slavia Sofia
1
2018

Performance by city

City Wins Clubs
Sofia 7 CSKA (4), Levski (3)
Razgrad 6 Ludogorets (6)
Plovdiv 3 Lokomotiv (2), Botev (1)
Lovech 1 Litex (1)
Stara Zagora 1 Beroe (1)
Varna 1 Cherno More (1)

External links

  • Bulgaria Cups Overview - Super Cup, RSSSF.com
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