Brazilian Football Confederation

Governing body of association football in Brazil

Brazilian Football Confederation
CONMEBOL
Brazilian Football Confederation logo.svg
Founded8 June 1914; 108 years ago (1914-06-08)
HeadquartersRio de Janeiro
FIFA affiliation1923[1]
CONMEBOL affiliation1916
PresidentEdnaldo Rodrigues (since 23 March 2022)
Websitewww.cbf.com.br Edit this at Wikidata

The Brazilian Football Confederation (Portuguese: Confederação Brasileira de Futebol; CBF) is the governing body of football in Brazil. It was founded on Monday, 8 June 1914, as Federação Brasileira de Sports [pt], and renamed Confederação Brasileira de Desportos in 1916. The football confederation, as known today, separated from other sports associations on 24 September 1979. Between 1914 and 1979 it was the governing body, or at least the international reference,[clarification needed] for other olympic sports, such as tennis (until the CBT was founded in 1955), athletics (until the CBAt was founded in 1977), handball (until 1979), swimming and waterpolo. It currently has the most wins on FIFA world cups, with a total of five.

The CBF has its headquarters in Rio de Janeiro.[2] The confederation owns a training center, named Granja Comary, located in Teresópolis.[3]

It was announced on 29 September 2007, that the CBF would launch a women's league and cup competition in October 2007 following pressure from FIFA president Sepp Blatter during the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China.[4][5]

Association staff

Name Position Source
Brazil Ednaldo Rodrigues President [6]
Brazil Antônio Aquino Vice-president [6]
Brazil Gustavo Feijo 2nd Vice-president [6]
Brazil Fernando Sarney 3rd Vice-president [6]
Brazil Castellar Guimaraes Neto 4th Vice-president [6]
Brazil Francisco Novelletto Neto 5th Vice-president [6]
Brazil Antônio Nunes 6th Vice-president [6]
Brazil Marcus Antônio Vincete 7th Vice-president [6]
Brazil Walter Feldman General Secretary [6]
Brazil Gilnei Botrel Tresurer [6]
Brazil Andre Megale Technical Director [6]
Brazil Tite Team Coach (Men's) [6]
Sweden Pia Sundhage Team Coach (Women's) [6]
Brazil Douglas Lunardi Media/Communications Manager [6]
Brazil Marcos Madeira Futsal Coordinator [6]
Brazil Sergio Correra Ds Silva Referee Coordinator [6]

References

  1. ^ Confederação Brasileira de Futebol - Association Information FIFA.com
  2. ^ Jonathan Watts (29 May 2015). "Brazil starts congressional inquiry into corruption after Fifa arrests". the guardian. Guardian News and Media. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  3. ^ "A sede da seleção pentacampeã: uma opção de passeio" (in Portuguese). TeresópolisOn. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  4. ^ "Brazil to set up women's soccer league". Sports. People's Daily. 29 September 2007. Archived from the original on 5 November 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2007.
  5. ^ "Brazil will create women soccer cup". Sports. People's Daily. 29 September 2007. Archived from the original on 5 November 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2007.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p FIFA.com. "Member Association - Brazil - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on 20 September 2020. Retrieved 11 November 2020.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Brazilian Football Confederation.
  • Official website (Portuguese and English)
  • CBF at YouTube

Other

  • Brazil at FIFA site
  • Website official Santos FC affiliation CBF
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Presidents of the Brazilian Football Confederation
  • Álvaro Zamith (1915–1916)
  • Arnaldo Guinle (1916–1920)
  • Ariovisto de Almeida Rêgo (1920–1921)
  • José Eduardo de Macedo Soares (1921–1922)
  • Oswaldo Gomes (1922–1924)
  • Ariovisto de Almeida Rêgo (1924)
  • Wladimir Bernardes (1924)
  • Oscar Rodrigues da Costa (1924–1927)
  • Renato Pacheco (1927–1933)
  • Álvaro Catão (1933–1936)
  • Luiz Aranha (1936–1943)
  • Rivadávia Correa Mayer (1943–1955)
  • Sylvio Correa Pacheco (1955–1958)
  • João Havelange (1958–1975)
  • Heleno de Barros Nunes (1975–1980)
  • Giulite Coutinho (1980–1986)
  • Octávio Pinto Guimarães (1986–1989)
  • Ricardo Teixeira (1989–2012)
  • José Maria Marin (2012–2015)
  • Marco Polo Del Nero (2015–2017)
  • Coronel Nunes (2017–2019)
  • Rogério Caboclo (2019–21)
  • Coronel Nunes (2021)
  • Ednaldo Rodrigues (2021–)
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